2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/622736
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
DNP Capstone Project
Level of Evidence:
Clinical Practice Guideline(s)
Research Approach:
Quantitative Research
Title:
Interventions To Reduce Medication Errors
Author(s):
Tucker, Tawana
Additional Author Information:
Tawana Tucker, DNP(c), MPH, RN; email: ttnurse1993@att.net
Advisors:
Schmidt, John; Bressie, Marylee; Glenn, Yvette
Degree:
DNP
Degree Year:
2017
Grantor:
Capella University
Abstract:

Medication errors are the most commonly identified errors occurring in every healthcare setting costing billions of dollars per year. They have the potential to cause death to a patient or increase hospital length of stay. A root cause analysis (RCA) was conducted after a nurse was interrupted several times during the medication administration process and gave medications to the wrong patient. Also, the number of medication errors for the post-operative, medical-surgical unit had increased to nineteen over one quarter. Distractions and interruptions of nurses during the medication administration process have been identified as a relatable factor causing medication errors. The Iowa Model was used to help guide the process of implementing several evidence-based strategies. Fourteen nurses from the unit completed the medication administration error reporting survey, and 71.43% strongly agreed that nurses are interrupted to perform other duties while administering medications. The strategies for the intervention included in the multi-pronged approach to reduce interruptions during the medication administration process were staff education; medication surveys; medication administration checklist; “Do Not Disturb” medication signs; staff voluntarily wearing medication vest; and observers that used the tool modeled after the California Nursing Outcomes Coalition. The project focus was on registered nurses (RN) on a post-operative, medical-surgical unit who were expected to comply with the evidence-based strategies. Twenty-one medication observations were completed with 17 interruptions, and it was noted that the RNs wore the medication vests during half of the observations. The medication error rate for the unit was ten at the beginning of the project and decreased to six errors by the end of the 12 weeks

Keywords:
medication errors; medication administration; interruptions
CINAHL Headings:
Medication Errors; Medication Errors--Prevention and Control; Patient Safety; Distraction; Drug Administration--Methods; Drug Administration
Note:
This work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.
Repository Posting Date:
2017-09-22T18:14:04Z
Date of Publication:
2017-09-22

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorSchmidt, Johnen
dc.contributor.advisorBressie, Maryleeen
dc.contributor.advisorGlenn, Yvetteen
dc.contributor.authorTucker, Tawanaen
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-22T18:14:04Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-22T18:14:04Z-
dc.date.issued2017-09-22-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/622736-
dc.description.abstract<p>Medication errors are the most commonly identified errors occurring in every healthcare setting costing billions of dollars per year. They have the potential to cause death to a patient or increase hospital length of stay. A root cause analysis (RCA) was conducted after a nurse was interrupted several times during the medication administration process and gave medications to the wrong patient. Also, the number of medication errors for the post-operative, medical-surgical unit had increased to nineteen over one quarter. Distractions and interruptions of nurses during the medication administration process have been identified as a relatable factor causing medication errors. The Iowa Model was used to help guide the process of implementing several evidence-based strategies. Fourteen nurses from the unit completed the medication administration error reporting survey, and 71.43% strongly agreed that nurses are interrupted to perform other duties while administering medications. The strategies for the intervention included in the multi-pronged approach to reduce interruptions during the medication administration process were staff education; medication surveys; medication administration checklist; “Do Not Disturb” medication signs; staff voluntarily wearing medication vest; and observers that used the tool modeled after the California Nursing Outcomes Coalition. The project focus was on registered nurses (RN) on a post-operative, medical-surgical unit who were expected to comply with the evidence-based strategies. Twenty-one medication observations were completed with 17 interruptions, and it was noted that the RNs wore the medication vests during half of the observations. The medication error rate for the unit was ten at the beginning of the project and decreased to six errors by the end of the 12 weeks</p>en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/*
dc.subjectmedication errorsen
dc.subjectmedication administrationen
dc.subjectinterruptionsen
dc.titleInterventions To Reduce Medication Errorsen_US
dc.typeDNP Capstone Projecten
thesis.degree.grantorCapella Universityen
thesis.degree.levelDNPen
dc.description.noteThis work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.-
dc.primary-author.detailsTawana Tucker, DNP(c), MPH, RN; email: ttnurse1993@att.neten
thesis.degree.year2017en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelClinical Practice Guideline(s)en
dc.research.approachQuantitative Researchen
dc.subject.cinahlMedication Errorsen
dc.subject.cinahlMedication Errors--Prevention and Controlen
dc.subject.cinahlPatient Safetyen
dc.subject.cinahlDistractionen
dc.subject.cinahlDrug Administration--Methodsen
dc.subject.cinahlDrug Administrationen
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