2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/623559
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Article
Level of Evidence:
Qualitative Study, Grounded Theory
Research Approach:
Qualitative Research
Title:
Resilience of Nurses in the Face of Disaster
Other Titles:
N/A
Author(s):
Turner, Stephanie B. ( 0000-0001-5968-5276 )
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Psi-at-Large
Author Details:
Stephanie Turner, Ed.D, MSN, RN,stephanie.turner@wgu.edu, Psi Upsilon Chapter
Abstract:

Abstract Objective On April 27, 2011, the state of Alabama encountered a horrific day of tornados that left a trail of damage throughout the state. The city of Tuscaloosa was devastated by an EF-4 that resulted in many victims and casualties. Druid City Hospital in Tuscaloosa had a massive inflow of victims with both mild and major injuries. When disasters such as this occur, nurses must respond with efficiency and effectiveness to help as many victims as possible. However, little is known about the psychological effects of disasters on nurses and how these impact nurses both personally and professionally. Because resilience can directly impact how a nurse responds to a situation, this article aimed to examine the resilience levels of nurses working during the disaster. Methods This study was part of a larger study examining the needs of nurses both before and after disasters. Ten nurses were interviewed and completed a 10-item survey on resilience, the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC). The full range of scores on this scale is from 0 to 40, with higher scores reflecting greater resilience. Results In this survey of 10 nurses, the scores ranged from 33 to 40, with a mean score of 36.7. Conclusions The nurses who were interviewed and completed the survey possessed a high level of resilience. More research should be done on the causes of increased resilience in nurses after disasters. ( Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness . 2015;9:601–604)

Keywords:
disaster; disaster medical response; emergency response
CINAHL Headings:
Emergency Nursing; Disasters; Disaster Planning; Emergencies; Emergency Nursing--Psychosocial Factors; Hardiness
Repository Posting Date:
27-Nov-2017
Date of Publication:
2015
Version of Published Work:
Post-print
Citation:
Resilience of Nurses in the Face of Disaster 2015, 9 (06):601 Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Sponsors:
University of Alabama
Note:
This article was peer-reviewed by the journal noted in this record. No additional peer evaluation was performed prior to posting in this repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.evidence.levelQualitative Study, Grounded Theoryen
dc.research.approachQualitative Researchen
dc.titleResilience of Nurses in the Face of Disaster-
dc.title.alternativeN/Aen
dc.contributor.authorTurner, Stephanie B.en
dc.contributor.departmentPsi-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsStephanie Turner, Ed.D, MSN, RN,stephanie.turner@wgu.edu, Psi Upsilon Chapteren
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/623559-
dc.description.abstract<p>Abstract Objective On April 27, 2011, the state of Alabama encountered a horrific day of tornados that left a trail of damage throughout the state. The city of Tuscaloosa was devastated by an EF-4 that resulted in many victims and casualties. Druid City Hospital in Tuscaloosa had a massive inflow of victims with both mild and major injuries. When disasters such as this occur, nurses must respond with efficiency and effectiveness to help as many victims as possible. However, little is known about the psychological effects of disasters on nurses and how these impact nurses both personally and professionally. Because resilience can directly impact how a nurse responds to a situation, this article aimed to examine the resilience levels of nurses working during the disaster. Methods This study was part of a larger study examining the needs of nurses both before and after disasters. Ten nurses were interviewed and completed a 10-item survey on resilience, the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC). The full range of scores on this scale is from 0 to 40, with higher scores reflecting greater resilience. Results In this survey of 10 nurses, the scores ranged from 33 to 40, with a mean score of 36.7. Conclusions The nurses who were interviewed and completed the survey possessed a high level of resilience. More research should be done on the causes of increased resilience in nurses after disasters. ( Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness . 2015;9:601–604)</p>en
dc.subjectdisasteren
dc.subjectdisaster medical responseen
dc.subjectemergency responseen
dc.subject.cinahlEmergency Nursingen
dc.subject.cinahlDisastersen
dc.subject.cinahlDisaster Planningen
dc.subject.cinahlEmergenciesen
dc.subject.cinahlEmergency Nursing--Psychosocial Factorsen
dc.subject.cinahlHardinessen
dc.date.available2017-11-27T22:12:31Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-27T22:12:31Z-
dc.type.versionPost-printen
dc.identifier.citationResilience of Nurses in the Face of Disaster 2015, 9 (06):601 Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparednessen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen
dc.identifier.issn1938-744X-
dc.identifier.issnDisaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/dmp.2015.70-
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Alabamaen
dc.identifier.citationResilience of Nurses in the Face of Disaster 2015, 9 (06):601 Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparednessen
dc.description.noteThis article was peer-reviewed by the journal noted in this record. No additional peer evaluation was performed prior to posting in this repository.-
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