2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/623573
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Dissertation
Level of Evidence:
Other
Research Approach:
Mixed/Multi Method Research
Title:
Nursing Faculty Perceptions on Teaching Critical Thinking
Author(s):
Clark, Doris A.
Additional Author Information:
Doris A. Clark, PhD
Advisors:
Bronner, Julia; Hughes, Gail F.; Sharps, Phyllis W.
Degree:
PhD
Degree Year:
2010
Grantor:
Capella University
Abstract:

The perceptions of nursing faculty teaching critical thinking (CT) affective attributes and cognitive skills are described in this quantitative, descriptive study. The study sample consisted of nurse educators from the National League of Nursing database. The purpose of the study was to gain nursing faculty perception of which teaching strategies they used to teach CT. The rationale for the study was to explore how nursing faculty teach nursing
students CT affective attributes and cognitive skills to care for clients with complex and multiple health care situations and in a highly technological health care environment.
Nursing faculty is obligated to create learning environments to promote CT.
Questionnaires were sent to 50 deans and directors of nursing programs asking them to describe which teaching strategies they thought were effective for teaching CT. Followup phone interviews were conducted with 7 nursing faculty who agreed to be interviewed. The results indicate that nursing faculty use multiple teaching strategies to effectively teach CT. The results indicate that nursing faculty believe that CT is a developmental process throughout the curriculum. The findings are congruent with the literature review, which showed that multiple teaching strategies were needed for development of CT affective attributes and cognitive skills. The findings are congruent with the current thinking about the use of simulation and technology in developing CT.

Keywords:
critical thinking; nursing education; teaching strategies
CINAHL Headings:
Critical Thinking; Critical Thinking--Education; Faculty, Nursing; Teaching Methods; Perception; Education, Nursing
Description:
This dissertation has also been disseminated through the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses database. Dissertation/thesis number: 3389872; ProQuest document ID: 305243381. The author still retains copyright.
Note:
This item has not gone through this repository's peer-review process, but has been accepted by the indicated university or college in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the specified degree.
Repository Posting Date:
2017-11-30T19:29:37Z
Date of Publication:
2017-11-30

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorBronner, Juliaen
dc.contributor.advisorHughes, Gail F.en
dc.contributor.advisorSharps, Phyllis W.en
dc.contributor.authorClark, Doris A.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-30T19:29:37Z-
dc.date.available2017-11-30T19:29:37Z-
dc.date.issued2017-11-30-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/623573-
dc.descriptionThis dissertation has also been disseminated through the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses database. Dissertation/thesis number: 3389872; ProQuest document ID: 305243381. The author still retains copyright.en
dc.description.abstract<p>The perceptions of nursing faculty teaching critical thinking (CT) affective attributes and cognitive skills are described in this quantitative, descriptive study. The study sample consisted of nurse educators from the National League of Nursing database. The purpose of the study was to gain nursing faculty perception of which teaching strategies they used to teach CT. The rationale for the study was to explore how nursing faculty teach nursing<br />students CT affective attributes and cognitive skills to care for clients with complex and multiple health care situations and in a highly technological health care environment.<br />Nursing faculty is obligated to create learning environments to promote CT.<br />Questionnaires were sent to 50 deans and directors of nursing programs asking them to describe which teaching strategies they thought were effective for teaching CT. Followup phone interviews were conducted with 7 nursing faculty who agreed to be interviewed. The results indicate that nursing faculty use multiple teaching strategies to effectively teach CT. The results indicate that nursing faculty believe that CT is a developmental process throughout the curriculum. The findings are congruent with the literature review, which showed that multiple teaching strategies were needed for development of CT affective attributes and cognitive skills. The findings are congruent with the current thinking about the use of simulation and technology in developing CT.</p>en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectcritical thinkingen
dc.subjectnursing educationen
dc.subjectteaching strategiesen
dc.titleNursing Faculty Perceptions on Teaching Critical Thinkingen_US
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorCapella Universityen
thesis.degree.levelPhDen
dc.description.noteThis item has not gone through this repository's peer-review process, but has been accepted by the indicated university or college in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the specified degree.en
dc.primary-author.detailsDoris A. Clark, PhDen
thesis.degree.year2010en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelOtheren
dc.research.approachMixed/Multi Method Researchen
dc.subject.cinahlCritical Thinkingen
dc.subject.cinahlCritical Thinking--Educationen
dc.subject.cinahlFaculty, Nursingen
dc.subject.cinahlTeaching Methodsen
dc.subject.cinahlPerceptionen
dc.subject.cinahlEducation, Nursingen
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