2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/623603
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
It's Fat Tuesday! Get the Skinny on Lean and the NPD Scope and Standards
Author(s):
Price, Greta
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
M. Greta Price, MSN-Ed, RN-BC, PCCN
Abstract:

One NPD department director was faced with a choice: become irrelevant and extinct or radically change the work being produced within the department. Upon direction from a chief nursing officer to “blow-up” the current department, the director began by conducting an intensive, three-month learning needs assessment and consulting a lean coach. The department held a two-day offsite strategic planning. The resultant vision and strategic objectives shaped the next year of work.<br /> <br /> The department developed specific metrics based off of the strategic objectives and the NPD scope and standards of practice. These metrics were tracked at a department huddle. Education requests (ERs) was the first process metric identified. The department identified waste by tracking ERs by type, scope, and TAT (turn-around-time). The department also identified large volumes of tasks being completed that were not within the scope of NPD practice. Out of 108 tracked requests only 43% were within scope. Process improvement requests compiled 38% and administrative requests composed a staggering 19%. This data confirmed what the staff had attempted to describe in initial conversations with the new director.<br /> <br /> The department deployed rapid cycle improvement techniques to start improving employee morale and establish a vetting process for education requests. Within one month, the number of education requests within the big six increased to 86%. Staff morale improved on a metric that was also being tracked by 15%. Sustainment models were developed to capture the improvement. In addition to improving morale and productivity, Lean improvement efforts contributed to roughly $500,000 per year savings in the NPD budget.

Keywords:
Lean Management; Employee Morale and Engagement
Repository Posting Date:
1-Dec-2017
Date of Publication:
1-Dec-2017
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
2017 ANPD Annual Convention
Conference Host:
Association for Nursing Professional Development (ANPD)
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Description:
2017 ANPD Annual Convention: Aspire to Transform. Held at the Hyatt Regency New Orleans.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleIt's Fat Tuesday! Get the Skinny on Lean and the NPD Scope and Standardsen_US
dc.contributor.authorPrice, Gretaen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsM. Greta Price, MSN-Ed, RN-BC, PCCNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/623603-
dc.description.abstract<p>One NPD department director was faced with a choice: become irrelevant and extinct or radically change the work being produced within the department. Upon direction from a chief nursing officer to &ldquo;blow-up&rdquo; the current department, the director began by conducting an intensive, three-month learning needs assessment and consulting a lean coach. The department held a two-day offsite strategic planning. The resultant vision and strategic objectives shaped the next year of work.&lt;br /&gt; &lt;br /&gt; The department developed specific metrics based off of the strategic objectives and the NPD scope and standards of practice. These metrics were tracked at a department huddle. Education requests (ERs) was the first process metric identified. The department identified waste by tracking ERs by type, scope, and TAT (turn-around-time). The department also identified large volumes of tasks being completed that were not within the scope of NPD practice. Out of 108 tracked requests only 43% were within scope. Process improvement requests compiled 38% and administrative requests composed a staggering 19%. This data confirmed what the staff had attempted to describe in initial conversations with the new director.&lt;br /&gt; &lt;br /&gt; The department deployed rapid cycle improvement techniques to start improving employee morale and establish a vetting process for education requests. Within one month, the number of education requests within the big six increased to 86%. Staff morale improved on a metric that was also being tracked by 15%. Sustainment models were developed to capture the improvement. In addition to improving morale and productivity, Lean improvement efforts contributed to roughly $500,000 per year savings in the NPD budget.</p>en
dc.subjectLean Managementen
dc.subjectEmployee Morale and Engagementen
dc.date.available2017-12-01T18:57:35Z-
dc.date.issued2017-12-01-
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-01T18:57:35Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name2017 ANPD Annual Conventionen
dc.conference.hostAssociation for Nursing Professional Development (ANPD)en
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen
dc.description2017 ANPD Annual Convention: Aspire to Transform. Held at the Hyatt Regency New Orleans.en
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.