2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/623652
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Evaluation of Educational Video on Nurses Discharge Teaching
Author(s):
Childress, Jennifer; Maloney, Lisa; Monroe, Kathy
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Jennifer Childress, BSN, RN, CPEN; Lisa Maloney, MSN, RN; Kathy Monroe, MD
Abstract:

Poster presentation

Session C presented Thursday, September 14, 2017

Purpose: During 2015, patients presenting to an urban pediatric emergency department (ED) for vomiting accounted for one of the top five chief complaints.  The American Academy of Pediatrics and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend oral rehydration (ORT) as the first line of treatment for vomiting in mildly dehydrated children.  The ED does not currently have an established procedure for oral rehydration education, thus leading to incomplete, inaccurate, or absent education for the caregiver.  The purpose of the project was to develop an educational video for nursing staff to be used in teaching oral rehydration to caregivers.  Nursing staff knowledge level was assessed regarding ORT education.

Design: Quality improvement initiative.

Setting: A 53-bed teaching level 1 urban pediatric trauma center in southeastern United States with approximately 70,000 visits annually.

Participants/Subjects: Conveinence sample of ED nursing staff - 38 RNs with varying degress (ADN, BSN, and MSN) and years of experience.  All participants reported having given oral rehydration instructions in the past.

Methods: Participants included a convenience sample of 38 ED nursing staff members in an urban pediatric ED with approximately 69,000 visits annually.  Participants completed a pre and post survey after viewing the educational video on oral rehydration.  Data was collected and entered into an excel spreadsheet and a z test for proportions was used to compare groups.

Results/Outcomes: When answering the question "What is your standard script for oral rehydration education for a patient that is 2 years old?” participants gave varying answers with only 73.68% giving the same answer as what is listed in the ED’s patient care guidelines.  After viewing the video, 94.73% of participants reported they would use the video in the future, comparing percent of RNs reporting giving instructions consistent with our PCGs in pre test to those in post test, we found measured difference in the proportions was 21% (z=2.53, p=0.011), (95% Cl 5%, 37%).

Participants listed perceived barriers to using the educational video in the ED as time, means of showing the video, or both.

Implications: Based on data collected during this study, participants are highly likely to use the educational video for oral rehydration education; however, they listed barriers to use of the video.  The researchers recommend increasing the number and availability of educational devices for nursing staff to effectively educate patients and caregivers. Further, the researchers recommend conducting a study on patients and caregivers to assess understanding for performing oral rehydration for children with the chief complaint of vomiting using the education video.

Keywords:
Discharge Teaching; Oral Rehydration Therapy (ORT); Emergency Department
Repository Posting Date:
4-Dec-2017
Date of Publication:
4-Dec-2017
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
Emergency Nursing 2017
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
St. Louis, Missouri, USA
Description:
ENA 2017: Education, Networking, Advocacy. Held at America's Center Convention Center, St. Louis, Missouri
Note:
Items submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository, unless otherwise noted.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleEvaluation of Educational Video on Nurses Discharge Teachingen_US
dc.contributor.authorChildress, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.authorMaloney, Lisaen
dc.contributor.authorMonroe, Kathyen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsJennifer Childress, BSN, RN, CPEN; Lisa Maloney, MSN, RN; Kathy Monroe, MDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/623652-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presentation</p> <p>Session C presented Thursday, September 14, 2017</p> <p>Purpose: During 2015, patients presenting to an urban pediatric emergency department (ED) for vomiting accounted for one of the top five chief complaints.&nbsp; The American Academy of Pediatrics and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend oral rehydration (ORT) as the first line of treatment for vomiting in mildly dehydrated children.&nbsp; The ED does not currently have an established procedure for oral rehydration education, thus leading to incomplete, inaccurate, or absent education for the caregiver.&nbsp; The purpose of the project was to develop an educational video for nursing staff to be used in teaching oral rehydration to caregivers.&nbsp; Nursing staff knowledge level was assessed regarding ORT education.</p> <p>Design: Quality improvement initiative.</p> <p>Setting: A 53-bed teaching level 1 urban pediatric trauma center in southeastern United States with approximately 70,000 visits annually.</p> <p>Participants/Subjects: Conveinence sample of ED nursing staff - 38 RNs with varying degress (ADN, BSN, and MSN) and years of experience.&nbsp; All participants reported having given oral rehydration instructions in the past.</p> <p>Methods: Participants included a convenience sample of 38 ED nursing staff members in an urban pediatric ED with approximately 69,000 visits annually.&nbsp; Participants completed a pre and post survey after viewing the educational video on oral rehydration.&nbsp; Data was collected and entered into an excel spreadsheet and a z test for proportions was used to compare groups.</p> <p>Results/Outcomes: When answering the question "What is your standard script for oral rehydration education for a patient that is 2 years old?&rdquo; participants gave varying answers with only 73.68% giving the same answer as what is listed in the ED&rsquo;s patient care guidelines.&nbsp; After viewing the video, 94.73% of participants reported they would use the video in the future, comparing percent of RNs reporting giving instructions consistent with our PCGs in pre test to those in post test, we found measured difference in the proportions was 21% (z=2.53, p=0.011), (95% Cl 5%, 37%).</p> <p>Participants listed perceived barriers to using the educational video in the ED as time, means of showing the video, or both.</p> <p>Implications: Based on data collected during this study, participants are highly likely to use the educational video for oral rehydration education; however, they listed barriers to use of the video.&nbsp; The researchers recommend increasing the number and availability of educational devices for nursing staff to effectively educate patients and caregivers. Further, the researchers recommend conducting a study on patients and caregivers to assess understanding for performing oral rehydration for children with the chief complaint of vomiting using the education video.</p>en
dc.subjectDischarge Teachingen
dc.subjectOral Rehydration Therapy (ORT)en
dc.subjectEmergency Departmenten
dc.date.available2017-12-04T19:15:04Z-
dc.date.issued2017-12-04-
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-04T19:15:04Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.nameEmergency Nursing 2017en
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen
dc.conference.locationSt. Louis, Missouri, USAen
dc.descriptionENA 2017: Education, Networking, Advocacy. Held at America's Center Convention Center, St. Louis, Missourien
dc.description.noteItems submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository, unless otherwise noted.-
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