2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/623703
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
Patient Perceptions of Nurse Listening Behaviors
Author(s):
Loos, Nancy
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Iota Sigma
Author Details:
Nancy Loos, MSN, RN, NE-BC
Abstract:

The purpose of this proposed interpretive phenomenological study is to discover, describe, and interpret patient perceptions of nurse listening behaviors. Because nurse listening is linked to an enhanced patient experience and improved patient outcomes, it is considered important enough that patient perception of its occurrence is solicited by the United States (US) Centers for Medicare or Medicaid (CMS) as part of the “HCAPHS” (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) survey (https://www.cms.gov, n.d.). However, little can be found in the literature describing which nursing behaviors patients perceive as listening behaviors. For inpatient nurses to reflect on and improve their interactions with patients, ultimately improving patient outcomes, they need to know how their behaviors are perceived, e.g., which to develop and which to avoid. Understanding this phenomenon will require consulting patients who have received hospital nursing care to appreciate their perceptions. Using qualitative methodology, the goal of this study is to elicit perceptions of adult immunosuppressed patients who have recently been hospitalized, regarding whether their nurses listened to them and, if so, which nurse behaviors caused them to believe listening had occurred. Alternatively, understanding which behaviors caused the perception of non-listening would help create a contrary case, providing further clarification of the construct. Understanding the way in which patients perceive nurse behaviors as they pertain to listening has implications across a spectrum of consequences: clinical, personal, financial, and educational…perhaps the most compelling of which is improved patient outcomes and experience.

Keywords:
Nurse Listening; KING
Repository Posting Date:
6-Dec-2017
Date of Publication:
6-Dec-2017
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
KING International Nursing Conference: Nursing Theory Development: Where We Have Been and Where We Are We Going
Conference Host:
KING International
Conference Location:
The University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, Mississippi, US
Description:
Nursing Theory Development: Where We Have Been and Where We Are We Going: Held at Asbury Hall The University of Southern Mississippi

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titlePatient Perceptions of Nurse Listening Behaviorsen_US
dc.contributor.authorLoos, Nancyen
dc.contributor.departmentIota Sigmaen
dc.author.detailsNancy Loos, MSN, RN, NE-BCen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/623703-
dc.description.abstract<p>The purpose of this proposed interpretive phenomenological study is to discover, describe, and interpret patient perceptions of nurse listening behaviors. Because nurse listening is linked to an enhanced patient experience and improved patient outcomes, it is considered important enough that patient perception of its occurrence is solicited by the United States (US) Centers for Medicare or Medicaid (CMS) as part of the &ldquo;HCAPHS&rdquo; (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) survey (https://www.cms.gov, n.d.). However, little can be found in the literature describing which nursing behaviors patients perceive as listening behaviors. For inpatient nurses to reflect on and improve their interactions with patients, ultimately improving patient outcomes, they need to know how their behaviors are perceived, e.g., which to develop and which to avoid. Understanding this phenomenon will require consulting patients who have received hospital nursing care to appreciate their perceptions. Using qualitative methodology, the goal of this study is to elicit perceptions of adult immunosuppressed patients who have recently been hospitalized, regarding whether their nurses listened to them and, if so, which nurse behaviors caused them to believe listening had occurred. Alternatively, understanding which behaviors caused the perception of non-listening would help create a contrary case, providing further clarification of the construct. Understanding the way in which patients perceive nurse behaviors as they pertain to listening has implications across a spectrum of consequences: clinical, personal, financial, and educational&hellip;perhaps the most compelling of which is improved patient outcomes and experience.</p>en
dc.subjectNurse Listeningen
dc.subjectKINGen
dc.date.available2017-12-06T16:07:54Z-
dc.date.issued2017-12-06-
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-06T16:07:54Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.nameKING International Nursing Conference: Nursing Theory Development: Where We Have Been and Where We Are We Goingen
dc.conference.hostKING Internationalen
dc.conference.locationThe University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, Mississippi, USen
dc.descriptionNursing Theory Development: Where We Have Been and Where We Are We Going: Held at Asbury Hall The University of Southern Mississippien
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