2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/623704
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
CONTEMPORARY MODELS FOR CLINICAL NURSING EDUCATION
Author(s):
Hill, Lauren; Williams, Ellen P.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Lauren Hill MSN, RN; Ellen P. Williams, PhD, RN
Abstract:

Approaches for clinical nursing education remain inadequate despite manifold calls for the use of alternative methods of experiential learning in schools of nursing. Mandates for transformation of clinical nursing education arise from multiple sources, including reports by the Institutes of Medicine and the Carnegie Foundation. On a pragmatic level, changes are driven by a scarcity of available clinical sites, generational differences in ways of learning, increased student/teacher ratios in traditional clinical settings, and an explosion of knowledge relative to health promotion, disease prevention, and treatment. Continuing use of traditional clinical nursing education models contributes to poor critical thinking and reasoning development among students and results in task-oriented approaches to teaching and learning. Consequently, students may lack the capacity to think through interventions that lead to positive patient outcomes. Traditional models often fail to cultivate trusting relationships necessary for goal attainment between students and educators. The purpose of this literature review is to explore contemporary clinical models for nursing education and to include findings regarding the creation of caring clinical learning environments which promote goal attainment by students and faculty.
Major search engines were used employing the phrases: nursing clinical education, nursing education models, and clinical education in nursing. Associate Degree (ADN) and Bachelor of Science (BSN) schools were included. Three key clinical nursing education models were identified and investigated. Features, advantages, and drawbacks associated with each approach are presented along with a discussion of perspectives on caring approaches used to stimulate student inquiry in the clinical setting. Caring relationships between students and educators have been found to enhance mutual goal setting through positive communication, constructive interactions and reduced stress. In conclusion, it is purported that new ways of delivering clinical education in nursing are warranted and will lead to increased graduate competence. Ultimately, patient outcomes will be improved.

Keywords:
Clinical Nursing Education; teaching models
Repository Posting Date:
6-Dec-2017
Date of Publication:
6-Dec-2017
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
KING International Nursing Conference: Nursing Theory Development: Where We Have Been and Where We Are We Going
Conference Host:
KING International
Conference Location:
The University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, Mississippi, US
Description:
Nursing Theory Development: Where We Have Been and Where We Are We Going: Held at Asbury Hall The University of Southern Mississippi

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleCONTEMPORARY MODELS FOR CLINICAL NURSING EDUCATIONen_US
dc.contributor.authorHill, Laurenen
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Ellen P.en
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsLauren Hill MSN, RN; Ellen P. Williams, PhD, RNen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/623704-
dc.description.abstract<p>Approaches for clinical nursing education remain inadequate despite manifold calls for the use of alternative methods of experiential learning in schools of nursing. Mandates for transformation of clinical nursing education arise from multiple sources, including reports by the Institutes of Medicine and the Carnegie Foundation. On a pragmatic level, changes are driven by a scarcity of available clinical sites, generational differences in ways of learning, increased student/teacher ratios in traditional clinical settings, and an explosion of knowledge relative to health promotion, disease prevention, and treatment. Continuing use of traditional clinical nursing education models contributes to poor critical thinking and reasoning development among students and results in task-oriented approaches to teaching and learning. Consequently, students may lack the capacity to think through interventions that lead to positive patient outcomes. Traditional models often fail to cultivate trusting relationships necessary for goal attainment between students and educators. The purpose of this literature review is to explore contemporary clinical models for nursing education and to include findings regarding the creation of caring clinical learning environments which promote goal attainment by students and faculty. <br />Major search engines were used employing the phrases: nursing clinical education, nursing education models, and clinical education in nursing. Associate Degree (ADN) and Bachelor of Science (BSN) schools were included. Three key clinical nursing education models were identified and investigated. Features, advantages, and drawbacks associated with each approach are presented along with a discussion of perspectives on caring approaches used to stimulate student inquiry in the clinical setting. Caring relationships between students and educators have been found to enhance mutual goal setting through positive communication, constructive interactions and reduced stress. In conclusion, it is purported that new ways of delivering clinical education in nursing are warranted and will lead to increased graduate competence. Ultimately, patient outcomes will be improved.</p>en
dc.subjectClinical Nursing Educationen
dc.subjectteaching modelsen
dc.date.available2017-12-06T16:11:55Z-
dc.date.issued2017-12-06-
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-06T16:11:55Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.nameKING International Nursing Conference: Nursing Theory Development: Where We Have Been and Where We Are We Goingen
dc.conference.hostKING Internationalen
dc.conference.locationThe University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, Mississippi, USen
dc.descriptionNursing Theory Development: Where We Have Been and Where We Are We Going: Held at Asbury Hall The University of Southern Mississippien
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