An Educational Intervention to Increase Human Papillomavirus Awareness and Intent to Vaccinate

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/623714
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
N/A
Research Approach:
N/A
Title:
An Educational Intervention to Increase Human Papillomavirus Awareness and Intent to Vaccinate
Author(s):
McDuffie, DeAndra
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
De Andra McDuffie, DNP, MSN, NP-C, WHNP-BC
Abstract:

Purpose: The purpose of this health improvement project was to develop and evaluate the impact of an educational intervention on knowledge of HPV/HPV vaccine and intent to vaccinate or recommend HPV vaccination in African American women in a clinical setting. The Health Belief Model provided the theoretical framework.



Summary: Thirty eligible participants—AA women between 18-70 years—were recruited and completed the project. Educational tools (patient handout and four-minute video) were created using evidence based approaches gathered from the literature review. The educational tools were created with an integrated pre/post-education quiz. Eligible participants were recruited from the patient waiting area. Informed consent was obtained, and participants completed the pre-education quiz. Upon completion of the patient handout and educational video, participants concluded the study with the post-education quiz.



Outcomes: Statistical analysis revealed a HPV knowledgeable population, however where knowledge deficits existed, the educational intervention improved knowledge. Among the target population (18-26 years), a significant increase in intent to vaccinate after the educational intervention transpired. Statistical significance expressed an increase to recommending the vaccine after an educational intervention.



Implications: Low national HPV vaccine rates and wider racial gaps of deaths from cervical cancer demonstrate a need for educational interventions among the African American community to increase knowledge and acceptability. This project is important to women’s health by demonstrating that improved knowledge in the clinical setting will increase intent to vaccinate among AA women. This leads to a positive impact on HPV-related disparities and such educational interventions should be considered in clinical practice to aid in narrowing racial gaps among AAs and improving HPV-related healthcare outcomes.

Keywords:
Enriching; Stimulating; Transforming
Repository Posting Date:
14-Dec-2017
Date of Publication:
14-Dec-2017
Conference Date:
2017
Conference Name:
20th Annual NPWH Premier Women's Healthcare Conference
Conference Host:
Nurse Practitioners in Women's Health
Conference Location:
Seattle, Washington, USA
Note:
Items submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository, unless otherwise noted.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePosteren
dc.evidence.levelN/Aen
dc.research.approachN/Aen
dc.titleAn Educational Intervention to Increase Human Papillomavirus Awareness and Intent to Vaccinateen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcDuffie, DeAndraen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsDe Andra McDuffie, DNP, MSN, NP-C, WHNP-BCen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/623714-
dc.description.abstract<p><p>Purpose: The purpose of this health improvement project was to develop and evaluate the impact of an educational intervention on knowledge of HPV/HPV vaccine and intent to vaccinate or recommend HPV vaccination in African American women in a clinical setting. The Health Belief Model provided the theoretical framework. </p> <br /> <br /><p>Summary: Thirty eligible participants—AA women between 18-70 years—were recruited and completed the project. Educational tools (patient handout and four-minute video) were created using evidence based approaches gathered from the literature review. The educational tools were created with an integrated pre/post-education quiz. Eligible participants were recruited from the patient waiting area. Informed consent was obtained, and participants completed the pre-education quiz. Upon completion of the patient handout and educational video, participants concluded the study with the post-education quiz.</p> <br /> <br /><p>Outcomes: Statistical analysis revealed a HPV knowledgeable population, however where knowledge deficits existed, the educational intervention improved knowledge. Among the target population (18-26 years), a significant increase in intent to vaccinate after the educational intervention transpired. Statistical significance expressed an increase to recommending the vaccine after an educational intervention.</p> <br /> <br /><p>Implications: Low national HPV vaccine rates and wider racial gaps of deaths from cervical cancer demonstrate a need for educational interventions among the African American community to increase knowledge and acceptability. This project is important to women’s health by demonstrating that improved knowledge in the clinical setting will increase intent to vaccinate among AA women. This leads to a positive impact on HPV-related disparities and such educational interventions should be considered in clinical practice to aid in narrowing racial gaps among AAs and improving HPV-related healthcare outcomes.</p></p>en
dc.subjectEnrichingen
dc.subjectStimulatingen
dc.subjectTransformingen
dc.date.available2017-12-14T19:59:32Z-
dc.date.issued2017-12-14-
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-14T19:59:32Z-
dc.conference.date2017en
dc.conference.name20th Annual NPWH Premier Women's Healthcare Conferenceen
dc.conference.hostNurse Practitioners in Women's Healthen
dc.conference.locationSeattle, Washington, USAen
dc.description.noteItems submitted to a conference/event were evaluated/peer-reviewed at the time of abstract submission to the event. No other peer-review was provided prior to submission to the Henderson Repository, unless otherwise noted.-
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