2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/623722
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Dissertation
Level of Evidence:
Observational Study, Other (e.g., Prevalence, Incidence)
Research Approach:
Mixed/Multi Method Research
Title:
Talking About Patients: Nurses' Language Use During Hand-offs
Author(s):
Ford, Yvonne Barthel
Additional Author Information:
Yvonne Ford, PhD, RN
Advisors:
Redman, Richard W.; Sampson, Deborah A.; Hinshaw, Ada Sue; Swales, John M.; Keenan, Gail M.
Degree:
PhD
Degree Year:
2009
Grantor:
The University of Michigan
Abstract:

Miscommunication during end of shift hand-offs between hospital nurses has been implicated as a source of errors in patient care, yet little research evaluates the structure of language during communication in an attempt to understand potential communication errors. Although the functions and meaning of hand-offs for nurses has previously been examined, there is little information about the current state of the structure and language of hand-offs. This research begins to fill that gap in by using genre analysis of transcripts of 43 end-of-shift hand-offs between nurses at four hospitals in the Midwestern United States.

Two analytic techniques common in linguistics research were carried out: a move analysis to determine the structure of the hand-offs, and corpus analysis to identify the lexical and grammatical features used by nurses during hand-offs. In addition, two methods used for hand-offs (audio-taped and face-to-face) were compared.

Findings from the analyses demonstrated that hand-offs were structured as (a) Introducing the Patient; (b) Relating the Shift's Events; (c) Looking Ahead; and (d) Wrapping Up. Further, analysis identified specific vocabulary and grammatical features upon which nurses rely as well as temporal components of nurses' language. The comparison of hand-off methods supports earlier findings that audio-taped hand-offs take less time than face-to-face hand-offs, but also identified that audio-taped hand-offs contain significantly fewer indicators of non-literal and interactive communication than face-to-face hand-offs.

Findings suggest that opportunities exist within the hand-off process to enhance patient safety in the areas of medication reconciliation, fall risk, pain management, and identification of goals and outcomes for patient care.

Keywords:
Nursing; Health Care Management; Interpersonal Communication; Language
CINAHL Headings:
Communication Methods, Total--Evaluation; Hand Off (Patient Safety); Communication; Nonverbal Communication; Verbal Behavior; Communication Methods, Total; Videorecording
Description:
This dissertation has also been disseminated through the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses database. Dissertation/thesis number: 3382185; ProQuest document ID: 304935603. The author still retains copyright.
Note:
This item has not gone through this repository's peer-review process, but has been accepted by the indicated university or college in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the specified degree.
Repository Posting Date:
2017-12-21T21:50:29Z
Date of Publication:
2017-12-21

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorRedman, Richard W.en
dc.contributor.advisorSampson, Deborah A.en
dc.contributor.advisorHinshaw, Ada Sueen
dc.contributor.advisorSwales, John M.en
dc.contributor.advisorKeenan, Gail M.en
dc.contributor.authorFord, Yvonne Barthelen
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-21T21:50:29Z-
dc.date.available2017-12-21T21:50:29Z-
dc.date.issued2017-12-21-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/623722-
dc.descriptionThis dissertation has also been disseminated through the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses database. Dissertation/thesis number: 3382185; ProQuest document ID: 304935603. The author still retains copyright.en
dc.description.abstract<p>Miscommunication during end of shift hand-offs between hospital nurses has been implicated as a source of errors in patient care, yet little research evaluates the structure of language during communication in an attempt to understand potential communication errors. Although the functions and meaning of hand-offs for nurses has previously been examined, there is little information about the current state of the structure and language of hand-offs. This research begins to fill that gap in by using genre analysis of transcripts of 43 end-of-shift hand-offs between nurses at four hospitals in the Midwestern United States.</p> <p>Two analytic techniques common in linguistics research were carried out: a move analysis to determine the structure of the hand-offs, and corpus analysis to identify the lexical and grammatical features used by nurses during hand-offs. In addition, two methods used for hand-offs (audio-taped and face-to-face) were compared.</p> <p>Findings from the analyses demonstrated that hand-offs were structured as (a) Introducing the Patient; (b) Relating the Shift's Events; (c) Looking Ahead; and (d) Wrapping Up. Further, analysis identified specific vocabulary and grammatical features upon which nurses rely as well as temporal components of nurses' language. The comparison of hand-off methods supports earlier findings that audio-taped hand-offs take less time than face-to-face hand-offs, but also identified that audio-taped hand-offs contain significantly fewer indicators of non-literal and interactive communication than face-to-face hand-offs.</p> <p>Findings suggest that opportunities exist within the hand-off process to enhance patient safety in the areas of medication reconciliation, fall risk, pain management, and identification of goals and outcomes for patient care.</p>en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectNursingen
dc.subjectHealth Care Managementen
dc.subjectInterpersonal Communicationen
dc.subjectLanguageen
dc.titleTalking About Patients: Nurses' Language Use During Hand-offsen_US
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Michiganen
thesis.degree.levelPhDen
dc.description.noteThis item has not gone through this repository's peer-review process, but has been accepted by the indicated university or college in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the specified degree.en
dc.primary-author.detailsYvonne Ford, PhD, RNen
thesis.degree.year2009en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelObservational Study, Other (e.g., Prevalence, Incidence)en
dc.research.approachMixed/Multi Method Researchen
dc.subject.cinahlCommunication Methods, Total--Evaluationen
dc.subject.cinahlHand Off (Patient Safety)en
dc.subject.cinahlCommunicationen
dc.subject.cinahlNonverbal Communicationen
dc.subject.cinahlVerbal Behavioren
dc.subject.cinahlCommunication Methods, Totalen
dc.subject.cinahlVideorecordingen
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