A Grounded Theory Study of Nurses Who Care for Patients Who Are Victims of Sexual Violence

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/623723
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Dissertation
Level of Evidence:
Qualitative Study, Grounded Theory
Research Approach:
Qualitative Research
Title:
A Grounded Theory Study of Nurses Who Care for Patients Who Are Victims of Sexual Violence
Author(s):
Whalen, Dara M.
Additional Author Information:
Dara Whalen, PhD, APN, FNP-BC, CNE, SANE
Advisors:
Colin, Jessie M.; Colvin, Mary; Chin, Claudette R.; McFadden, John P.
Degree:
PhD
Degree Year:
2016
Grantor:
Barry University
Abstract:

Background: Sexual violence is a widespread traumatic event that has physical, psychological, financial, and spiritual implications for victims, their friends and family, and the community. The negative and long-term effects include poor health outcomes, depression, substance abuse disorders, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Many nurses who treat these patients are inadequately trained.

Purpose: The treatment of nurses towards patients who are victims of sexual violence can mitigate or contribute to perceived revictimization of patients. The purpose of this qualitative study was to identify the processes and uncover the attitudes and behaviors of nurses without specialized training who care for patients who are victims of sexual violence. Additionally, the purpose was to generate a theory that describes the process that these nurses use to make decisions about how to provide proper care.

Philosophical Underpinnings: This qualitative constructivist grounded theory study was guided by symbolic interactionism and pragmatist philosophy.

Method: Charmaz’s grounded theory method of inquiry was used for this qualitative study. Data were collected with semistructured interviews with 13 emergency department nurses without specialized training in treating sexual violence victims and a focus group of five Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners. Data analysis took place with a constant comparative process to reveal the conceptual categories and themes. The focus group confirmed the categories.

Findings: Four themes emerged: Avoiding, Attempting, Analyzing, and Adjusting. The basic social process and substantive theory that emerged was Apprehending an Unknown Phenomenon. This framework provides an in-depth understanding of the decision making process of nurses caring for victims of sexual violence.

Conclusion: This study provided deeper understanding of nurses’ perceptions and experiences in decisions to treat patients who experienced sexual violence. The theory developed can be used to guide nurses’ decision making when they have little or no training on which to base their decisions. With further development of an evidence-based model, study findings should help improve outcomes for patients and reduce stress and anxiety in nurses who treat patients who have experienced traumatic sexual violence.

Keywords:
Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners; nurse training
CINAHL Headings:
Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners; Nurse Attitudes; Nursing Role; Sexual Abuse--Nursing; Sexual Assault Examination; Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners--Education
Description:
The author retains copyright.
Note:
This item has not gone through this repository's peer-review process, but has been accepted by the indicated university or college in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the specified degree.
Repository Posting Date:
2017-12-21T22:00:06Z
Date of Publication:
2017-12-21

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorColin, Jessie M.en
dc.contributor.advisorColvin, Maryen
dc.contributor.advisorChin, Claudette R.en
dc.contributor.advisorMcFadden, John P.en
dc.contributor.authorWhalen, Dara M.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-21T22:00:06Z-
dc.date.available2017-12-21T22:00:06Z-
dc.date.issued2017-12-21-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/623723-
dc.descriptionThe author retains copyright.en
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Background:</strong> Sexual violence is a widespread traumatic event that has physical, psychological, financial, and spiritual implications for victims, their friends and family, and the community. The negative and long-term effects include poor health outcomes, depression, substance abuse disorders, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Many nurses who treat these patients are inadequately trained.</p><p><strong>Purpose:</strong> The treatment of nurses towards patients who are victims of sexual violence can mitigate or contribute to perceived revictimization of patients. The purpose of this qualitative study was to identify the processes and uncover the attitudes and behaviors of nurses without specialized training who care for patients who are victims of sexual violence. Additionally, the purpose was to generate a theory that describes the process that these nurses use to make decisions about how to provide proper care. <p><strong>Philosophical Underpinnings:</strong> This qualitative constructivist grounded theory study was guided by symbolic interactionism and pragmatist philosophy.</p> <p><strong>Method:</strong> Charmaz’s grounded theory method of inquiry was used for this qualitative study. Data were collected with semistructured interviews with 13 emergency department nurses without specialized training in treating sexual violence victims and a focus group of five Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners. Data analysis took place with a constant comparative process to reveal the conceptual categories and themes. The focus group confirmed the categories.</p> <p><strong>Findings:</strong> Four themes emerged: Avoiding, Attempting, Analyzing, and Adjusting. The basic social process and substantive theory that emerged was Apprehending an Unknown Phenomenon. This framework provides an in-depth understanding of the decision making process of nurses caring for victims of sexual violence.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> This study provided deeper understanding of nurses’ perceptions and experiences in decisions to treat patients who experienced sexual violence. The theory developed can be used to guide nurses’ decision making when they have little or no training on which to base their decisions. With further development of an evidence-based model, study findings should help improve outcomes for patients and reduce stress and anxiety in nurses who treat patients who have experienced traumatic sexual violence.</p>en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectSexual Assault Nurse Examinersen
dc.subjectnurse trainingen
dc.titleA Grounded Theory Study of Nurses Who Care for Patients Who Are Victims of Sexual Violenceen_US
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorBarry Universityen
thesis.degree.levelPhDen
dc.description.noteThis item has not gone through this repository's peer-review process, but has been accepted by the indicated university or college in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the specified degree.en
dc.primary-author.detailsDara Whalen, PhD, APN, FNP-BC, CNE, SANEen
thesis.degree.year2016en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelQualitative Study, Grounded Theoryen
dc.research.approachQualitative Researchen
dc.subject.cinahlSexual Assault Nurse Examinersen
dc.subject.cinahlNurse Attitudesen
dc.subject.cinahlNursing Roleen
dc.subject.cinahlSexual Abuse--Nursingen
dc.subject.cinahlSexual Assault Examinationen
dc.subject.cinahlSexual Assault Nurse Examiners--Educationen
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