Exploring nurses' perceptions of dignity during end-of-life care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/623726
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Dissertation
Level of Evidence:
Qualitative Study, Grounded Theory
Research Approach:
Qualitative Research
Title:
Exploring nurses' perceptions of dignity during end-of-life care
Author(s):
Crump, Barbara
Additional Author Information:
Barbara Crump, PhD
Advisors:
Mullen, Cydney; Kendrick, Lorna; Miller, Marilyn
Degree:
PhD
Degree Year:
2016
Grantor:
University of Phoenix
Abstract:

The purpose of this qualitative grounded theory study was to understand nurses’ perceptions of care that supports patients’ dignity during hospitalization at the end of life, and to propose a theoretical foundation consistent with these perceptions as a guide to practice. The research involved analyzing perceptions about processes that can explain how nurses perceive care that supports patients’ dignity at the end of life during hospitalization. The aim of the research in this study included a focus on the general problem that patients’ dignity is not always respected by healthcare providers according to the review of the literature and the acknowledgment of the lack of theories related to nurses’ perceptions of care that supports dignity during end-of-life care. A grounded theory design offered a systematic approach to developing a theoretical model from data that takes into consideration the complexities of nurses’ perceptions of care that supports dignity during hospitalization at end of life. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 11 experienced registered oncology female nurses from the northeastern region of the United States. The research involved analysis of the perceptions of nurses caring for cancer patients admitted to the hospital during end of life. The development of a beginning model for dignity care stemmed from the emergence of three major categories, which were communication, support, and facilitation. The identified subcategories were education, workshops, course curriculum, in-services, being an advocate, listening, being present, physical needs, emotional support, compassion, honoring wishes, respect, and being treated as human. The emergence and development of a dignity model may offer a process that can serve as a valuable reference in providing care that supports the dignity of patients during hospitalization at end of life.

Keywords:
end of life care; dignity care
CINAHL Headings:
Palliative Care; Terminal Care; Hospice and Palliative Nursing; Nurse Attitudes; Human Dignity; Terminally Ill Patients
Description:
This dissertation has also been disseminated through the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses database. Dissertation/thesis number: 10196200; ProQuest document ID: 1853134336. The author still retains copyright.
Note:
This item has not gone through this repository's peer-review process, but has been accepted by the indicated university or college in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the specified degree.
Repository Posting Date:
2017-12-22T17:58:45Z
Date of Publication:
2017-12-22

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorMullen, Cydneyen
dc.contributor.advisorKendrick, Lornaen
dc.contributor.advisorMiller, Marilynen
dc.contributor.authorCrump, Barbaraen
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-22T17:58:45Z-
dc.date.available2017-12-22T17:58:45Z-
dc.date.issued2017-12-22-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/623726-
dc.descriptionThis dissertation has also been disseminated through the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses database. Dissertation/thesis number: 10196200; ProQuest document ID: 1853134336. The author still retains copyright.en
dc.description.abstract<p><span>The purpose </span><span class="hit">of</span><span> this qualitative grounded theory study was to understand </span><span class="hit">nurses</span><span>’ </span><span class="hit">perceptions</span><span> </span><span class="hit">of</span><span> </span><span class="hit">care</span><span> that supports patients’ </span><span class="hit">dignity</span><span> </span><span class="hit">during</span><span> hospitalization at the </span><span class="hit">end</span><span> </span><span class="hit">of</span><span> </span><span class="hit">life</span><span>, and to propose a theoretical foundation consistent with these </span><span class="hit">perceptions</span><span> as a guide to practice. The research involved analyzing </span><span class="hit">perceptions</span><span> about processes that can explain how </span><span class="hit">nurses</span><span> perceive </span><span class="hit">care</span><span> that supports patients’ </span><span class="hit">dignity</span><span> at the </span><span class="hit">end</span><span> </span><span class="hit">of</span><span> </span><span class="hit">life</span><span> </span><span class="hit">during</span><span> hospitalization. The aim </span><span class="hit">of</span><span> the research in this study included a focus on the general problem that patients’ </span><span class="hit">dignity</span><span> is not always respected by healthcare providers according to the review </span><span class="hit">of</span><span> the literature and the acknowledgment </span><span class="hit">of</span><span> the lack </span><span class="hit">of</span><span> theories related to </span><span class="hit">nurses</span><span>’ </span><span class="hit">perceptions</span><span> </span><span class="hit">of</span><span> </span><span class="hit">care</span><span> that supports </span><span class="hit">dignity</span><span> </span><span class="hit">during</span><span> </span><span class="hit">end</span><span>-</span><span class="hit">of</span><span>-</span><span class="hit">life</span><span> </span><span class="hit">care</span><span>. A grounded theory design offered a systematic approach to developing a theoretical model from data that takes into consideration the complexities </span><span class="hit">of</span><span> </span><span class="hit">nurses</span><span>’ </span><span class="hit">perceptions</span><span> </span><span class="hit">of</span><span> </span><span class="hit">care</span><span> that supports </span><span class="hit">dignity</span><span> </span><span class="hit">during</span><span> hospitalization at </span><span class="hit">end</span><span> </span><span class="hit">of</span><span> </span><span class="hit">life</span><span>. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 11 experienced registered oncology female </span><span class="hit">nurses</span><span> from the northeastern region </span><span class="hit">of</span><span> the United States. The research involved analysis </span><span class="hit">of</span><span> the </span><span class="hit">perceptions</span><span> </span><span class="hit">of</span><span> </span><span class="hit">nurses</span><span> caring for cancer patients admitted to the hospital </span><span class="hit">during</span><span> </span><span class="hit">end</span><span> </span><span class="hit">of</span><span> </span><span class="hit">life</span><span>. The development </span><span class="hit">of</span><span> a beginning model for </span><span class="hit">dignity</span><span> </span><span class="hit">care</span><span> stemmed from the emergence </span><span class="hit">of</span><span> three major categories, which were communication, support, and facilitation. The identified subcategories were education, workshops, course curriculum, in-services, being an advocate, listening, being present, physical needs, emotional support, compassion, honoring wishes, respect, and being treated as human. The emergence and development </span><span class="hit">of</span><span> a </span><span class="hit">dignity</span><span> model may offer a process that can serve as a valuable reference in providing </span><span class="hit">care</span><span> that supports the </span><span class="hit">dignity</span><span> </span><span class="hit">of</span><span> patients </span><span class="hit">during</span><span> hospitalization at </span><span class="hit">end</span><span> </span><span class="hit">of</span><span> </span><span class="hit">life</span><span>.</span></p>en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectend of life careen
dc.subjectdignity careen
dc.titleExploring nurses' perceptions of dignity during end-of-life careen_US
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Phoenixen
thesis.degree.levelPhDen
dc.description.noteThis item has not gone through this repository's peer-review process, but has been accepted by the indicated university or college in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the specified degree.en
dc.primary-author.detailsBarbara Crump, PhDen
thesis.degree.year2016en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelQualitative Study, Grounded Theoryen
dc.research.approachQualitative Researchen
dc.subject.cinahlPalliative Careen
dc.subject.cinahlTerminal Careen
dc.subject.cinahlHospice and Palliative Nursingen
dc.subject.cinahlNurse Attitudesen
dc.subject.cinahlHuman Dignityen
dc.subject.cinahlTerminally Ill Patientsen
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