Understanding the concept of Usog among the Aetas of Nabuclod, Pampanga, Philippines

11.67
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/623747
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Research Study
Level of Evidence:
Qualitative Study, Other
Research Approach:
Qualitative Research
Title:
Understanding the concept of Usog among the Aetas of Nabuclod, Pampanga, Philippines
Author(s):
Martinez, Rudolf Cymorr Kirby ( 0000-0002-5323-5108 ) ; Cortez, Augustine Beth; Contreras, Vanessa Joy
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Rudolf Cymorr Kirby P. Martinez, PhD, MA, RN, CAA, LMT, CSTP, FRIN, e-mail: rmartinez@sanbeda.edu.ph
Abstract:

AIMS: In spite of the popular belief that Usog produces physical symptoms, the definition of this concept serves to be complex, varying among the different regions in the Philippines. The apparent lack of literature regarding the Aetas’ view on Usog and the health implications of this phenomenon prompted the researchers to explore the concept of Usog among the Aetas of Nabuclod, Pampanga.

 

METHODS: In this qualitative study, in-depth interviews were conducted to gather data from the respondents. Purposive sampling was used in the selection of subjects and informed consent was sought. Following the individual interviews with five different Aeta families, thematic analysis was done so as to identify the common emerging concept of Usog.

 

FINDINGS: It was found that the Aetas of Nabuclod see Usog as a transmittable mystical force primarily inflicted by humans and not by spirits. This force is said to be transferred unintentionally through eye or physical contact. Similarly, this usually affects infants, with crying fits as the most common symptom. The Aetas’ primary treatment for Usog was the use of Amyong as incense or decoction. The saliva of the inflictor of Usog, when applied on the abdomen or forehead of the afflicted infant was also seen as an effective remedy.

 

IMPLICATION: The Aetas of Nabuclod, Pampanga see Usog as a transmittable mystical force unintentionally inflicted by humans through eye or physical contact, thereby producing physical symptoms among its victims. Consequently, community health nurses must be aware of this health belief so as to fully understand its implications to the Aetas’ health-seeking behaviors

Keywords:
Aeta; Usog
CINAHL Headings:
Aborigines--Philippines; Culture; Superstitions; Health Beliefs; Aborigines--Psychosocial Factors
Repository Posting Date:
2-Mar-2018
Date of Publication:
2-Mar-2018
Note:
This work has been approved through a peer-review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typeResearch Studyen
dc.evidence.levelQualitative Study, Otheren
dc.research.approachQualitative Researchen
dc.titleUnderstanding the concept of Usog among the Aetas of Nabuclod, Pampanga, Philippinesen_US
dc.contributor.authorMartinez, Rudolf Cymorr Kirbyen
dc.contributor.authorCortez, Augustine Bethen
dc.contributor.authorContreras, Vanessa Joyen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsRudolf Cymorr Kirby P. Martinez, PhD, MA, RN, CAA, LMT, CSTP, FRIN, e-mail: rmartinez@sanbeda.edu.phen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/623747-
dc.description.abstract<p>AIMS: In spite of the popular belief that <em>Usog</em> produces physical symptoms, the definition of this concept serves to be complex, varying among the different regions in the Philippines. The apparent lack of literature regarding the Aetas’ view on <em>Usog</em> and the health implications of this phenomenon prompted the researchers to explore the concept of <em>Usog</em> among the Aetas of Nabuclod, Pampanga.</p> <p> </p> <p>METHODS: In this qualitative study, in-depth interviews were conducted to gather data from the respondents. Purposive sampling was used in the selection of subjects and informed consent was sought. Following the individual interviews with five different Aeta families, thematic analysis was done so as to identify the common emerging concept of <em>Usog</em>.</p> <p> </p> <p>FINDINGS: It was found that the Aetas of Nabuclod see <em>Usog</em> as a transmittable mystical force primarily inflicted by humans and not by spirits. This force is said to be transferred unintentionally through eye or physical contact. Similarly, this usually affects infants, with crying fits as the most common symptom. The Aetas’ primary treatment for <em>Usog</em> was the use of Amyong as incense or decoction. The saliva of the inflictor of <em>Usog</em>, when applied on the abdomen or forehead of the afflicted infant was also seen as an effective remedy.</p> <p> </p> <p>IMPLICATION: The Aetas of Nabuclod, Pampanga see <em>Usog</em> as a transmittable mystical force unintentionally inflicted by humans through eye or physical contact, thereby producing physical symptoms among its victims. Consequently, community health nurses must be aware of this health belief so as to fully understand its implications to the Aetas’ health-seeking behaviors</p>en
dc.subjectAetaen
dc.subjectUsogen
dc.subject.cinahlAborigines--Philippinesen
dc.subject.cinahlCultureen
dc.subject.cinahlSuperstitionsen
dc.subject.cinahlHealth Beliefsen
dc.subject.cinahlAborigines--Psychosocial Factorsen
dc.date.available2018-03-02T19:02:37Z-
dc.date.issued2018-03-02-
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-02T19:02:37Z-
dc.description.noteThis work has been approved through a peer-review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.