Exploring the Moderating Effect of a Caring Work Environment on the Relationship Between Workplace Mistreatment and Nurses' Ability to Provide Patient Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/623946
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Dissertation
Level of Evidence:
Other
Research Approach:
Mixed/Multi Method Research
Title:
Exploring the Moderating Effect of a Caring Work Environment on the Relationship Between Workplace Mistreatment and Nurses' Ability to Provide Patient Care
Author(s):
Moffa, Christine M.
Additional Author Information:
Christine M. Moffa, PhD, RN
Advisors:
Liehr, Patricia; Longo, Joy; Caudill, Steven
Degree:
PhD
Degree Year:
2017
Grantor:
Florida Atlantic University
Abstract:

Workplace mistreatment (bullying, horizontal violence, and incivility) has been shown to impact nurses’ work satisfaction, job turnover, and physical and mental health. However, there are limited studies that examine its effect on patient outcomes. A correlational descriptive study of 79 acute care nurses was used to test a social justice model for examining the relationship between workplace mistreatment, quantified as threats to dimensions of nurses’ well-being (health, personal security, reasoning, respect, attachment, and self-determination), and nurses’ ability to provide quality patient care. In addition, this study considered the moderating effect of caring work environment among co-workers on nurses’ ability to provide quality patient care in the face of workplace mistreatment. Stories of workplace mistreatment were collected anonymously and analyzed for alignment with threats to six dimensions of well-being. Ability to provide
patient care was measured using the Healthcare Productivity Survey and a caring work environment was measured via the Culture of Companionate Love scale.

The results demonstrated that threats to all six dimensions of well-being described by Powers and Faden (2006) were expressed in nurses’ stories of workplace mistreatment. Furthermore, 87% reported a decrease in ability to provide patient care after an incident of workplace mistreatment. Yet frequency of threatened dimensions did not have a significant relationship with ability to provide patient care. Moreover, there was a significant moderator effect of the caring work environment on the relationship
between number of threatened dimensions of well-being and ability to provide quality patient care. Nurses in high caring environments loss less ability to provide care than nurses in low caring environments when one to three dimensions of well-being were threatened. However, this relationship reversed when four or more dimensions were threatened. Implications include further research on the relationship between workplace
mistreatment and nurse well-being and changing practice to include fostering a caring work environment in healthcare facilities.

Keywords:
workplace mistreatment; well being
CINAHL Headings:
Organizational Culture; Patient Care; Work Environment; Work Environment--Psychosocial Factors; Bullying; Disruptive Behavior; Incivility; Patient Safety; Quality of Health Care; Workplace Violence; Workplace Violence--Psychosocial Factors
Description:
The author still retains copyright.
Note:
This item has not gone through this repository's peer-review process, but has been accepted by the indicated university or college in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the specified degree.
Repository Posting Date:
2018-03-22T21:01:04Z
Date of Publication:
2018-03-22

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorLiehr, Patriciaen
dc.contributor.advisorLongo, Joyen
dc.contributor.advisorCaudill, Stevenen
dc.contributor.authorMoffa, Christine M.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-22T21:01:04Z-
dc.date.available2018-03-22T21:01:04Z-
dc.date.issued2018-03-22-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/623946-
dc.descriptionThe author still retains copyright.en
dc.description.abstract<p>Workplace mistreatment (bullying, horizontal violence, and incivility) has been shown to impact nurses’ work satisfaction, job turnover, and physical and mental health. However, there are limited studies that examine its effect on patient outcomes. A correlational descriptive study of 79 acute care nurses was used to test a social justice model for examining the relationship between workplace mistreatment, quantified as threats to dimensions of nurses’ well-being (health, personal security, reasoning, respect, attachment, and self-determination), and nurses’ ability to provide quality patient care. In addition, this study considered the moderating effect of caring work environment among co-workers on nurses’ ability to provide quality patient care in the face of workplace mistreatment. Stories of workplace mistreatment were collected anonymously and analyzed for alignment with threats to six dimensions of well-being. Ability to provide<br />patient care was measured using the Healthcare Productivity Survey and a caring work environment was measured via the Culture of Companionate Love scale.<br /><br />The results demonstrated that threats to all six dimensions of well-being described by Powers and Faden (2006) were expressed in nurses’ stories of workplace mistreatment. Furthermore, 87% reported a decrease in ability to provide patient care after an incident of workplace mistreatment. Yet frequency of threatened dimensions did not have a significant relationship with ability to provide patient care. Moreover, there was a significant moderator effect of the caring work environment on the relationship<br />between number of threatened dimensions of well-being and ability to provide quality patient care. Nurses in high caring environments loss less ability to provide care than nurses in low caring environments when one to three dimensions of well-being were threatened. However, this relationship reversed when four or more dimensions were threatened. Implications include further research on the relationship between workplace<br />mistreatment and nurse well-being and changing practice to include fostering a caring work environment in healthcare facilities.</p>en
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectworkplace mistreatmenten
dc.subjectwell beingen
dc.titleExploring the Moderating Effect of a Caring Work Environment on the Relationship Between Workplace Mistreatment and Nurses' Ability to Provide Patient Careen_US
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorFlorida Atlantic Universityen
thesis.degree.levelPhDen
dc.description.noteThis item has not gone through this repository's peer-review process, but has been accepted by the indicated university or college in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the specified degree.en
dc.primary-author.detailsChristine M. Moffa, PhD, RNen
thesis.degree.year2017en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.evidence.levelOtheren
dc.research.approachMixed/Multi Method Researchen
dc.subject.cinahlOrganizational Cultureen
dc.subject.cinahlPatient Careen
dc.subject.cinahlWork Environmenten
dc.subject.cinahlWork Environment--Psychosocial Factorsen
dc.subject.cinahlBullyingen
dc.subject.cinahlDisruptive Behavioren
dc.subject.cinahlIncivilityen
dc.subject.cinahlPatient Safetyen
dc.subject.cinahlQuality of Health Careen
dc.subject.cinahlWorkplace Violenceen
dc.subject.cinahlWorkplace Violence--Psychosocial Factorsen
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